3.

I loved being able to catch at glimpse at least of each project and talk with the students involved if I chose to. I appreciated enormously their willingness to answer questions and share their experiences along the way. Projects I was not interested in myself were often as inspiring and engaging as those on topics that are already meaningful to me. So it broadened my understandings both of the range of students and families in the GSA community and also of a few areas of interest that I had not found open to me before.

4.

Somehow allow more time for the event; one hour was too short, and 90 minutes would be adequate. Adults attending the event are bound to converse with friends and neighbors, parents and students, as well as inspecting the projects, so it takes more time than if we were sitting in an auditorium. I also think the students should have greater advance notice of the timing and expectations for this ev
ent. I also would like to see more community publicity if possible, in the form of posters and press releases, so that families within the GSA are who don't have children enrolled at the school can learn from this event. On the assumption that the attendees may become more numerous, more space will be needed to allow for safe movement, and the event may have to expand beyond the gymnasium. 


                                                                                    
      9:24 AM (11 hours ago)

Dear Congressman -- 

I'm appreciative of your interest in Medicare’s Sustainable Growth Rate formula and replacing it with the reforms outlined in the Medicare Access and Chip Reauthorization Act. I know you will want to look more closely at the decisions made here. In addition to avoiding a highly destructive reduction in payments to Medicare providers, you may be enlisting the entire block of us into an incentive program that will mean additional paperwork and assessment costs on a continuous basis, without any scientific basis and without likelihood of improving care. 

In fact, incentive programs based on quality of care appear likely to erode quality of care. It's ironic to consider, but it's vital to consider this too. Please take a close look at one or more of the links I offer you here, to discover data for considering this, presented in a convenient and meaningful way. I am selecting materials that are user-friendly and not overly time-consuming to absorb and base pragmatic planning on. One is a short clear instructive animated YouTube video,  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u6XAPnuFjJc   

You may also want to read the article at http://www.bmj.com/content/342/bmj.d108.full because it offers a clear example of what the video gives you an overview of. The article is research on an incentive program  to improve quality of care in Britain, published in the peer-reviewed British Medical Journal. I will paste in the summary below; you can find the complete article at the link.

Sincerely,

Stephen Benson, PhD, licensed Maine psychologist #PS909

 

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